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Old 01-07-2010, 04:55 AM   #1
Tri-State Aficionado
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Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PA
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1969 Camaro, 2004 TL

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Buick Regal GS Concept

I think I'm in shock here. I actually want a Buick, something that I can't say about any model built since the last GN rolled off the line. In fact, short of the Enclave, you couldn't pay me to drive one built in that time period, but this car is the definitive end of that era(I suppose you could argue that the new Lacrosse deserves that title though).

The Regal GS is based directly on the high-performance OPC version of the Opel Insignia, but instead of using the foreigner's 325-horsepower turbocharged V6, Buick is sticking with its four-cylinder-only strategy for the Regal. The GS is powered by a higher output version of the 2.0-liter direct-injected EcoTec four-cylinder that we've come to know and love in numerous GM products over the few years, with the tell-tale dual portholes on either side of its hood indicating its intentions. In this application, powertrain engineers have re-tuned the engine from its original 260 hp and 260 pound-feet of torque to 255 hp and 295 pound-feet. The GS is also equipped with a six-speed manual gearbox... in a Buick! While we tend to favor three-pedal configurations, we're confident that the GS will also be available with a self-shifting option when it arrives in showrooms.

Back in the glory days of the GNX, turbo Regals offered plenty of capability for ramping up velocities. But when it came time to slow down or chang direction... well, when's the last time you saw a tight left-hander or chicane at your local drag strip? Being a true European sport sedan this go-'round, Buick has apparently covered all the bases when it comes to managing kinetic energy.

To convert that forward momentum into thermal energy Buick went with one of the top names in the business: Brembo. The front wheels are equipped with 14-inch cross-drilled rotors and four-pot mono-block calipers... again, on a Buick! Match it all up with 19-inch wheels wearing appropriate rubber and the GS should haul down in a hurry.

The last time a Regal had any serious performance, the tractive effort was handled only by the car's rear axle. Since this new version is a normally front-wheel drive, having any real credibility means adding an all-wheel drive system. Fortunately, the Epsilon II platform has already been engineered for this. Using the latest edition of the Haldex-based torque vectoring system that served duty in the Saab Turbo-X, the Regal should be able to send power to the wheels that need it most and move the car in any direction the driver wants with ease.

Proper control of a performance car also requires a proper working environment for the driver. In the Regal that means a thick-rimmed steering wheel with a flattened bottom. That last bit should help ease getting in and out of the heavily bolstered Recaro thrones. (Hey GM, if a Buick Regal can sport Recaros, when will we get some better seats in the Corvette?) While ensconced, the driver can use an Interactive Drive Control System (IDCS) to select different settings for the throttle response, adaptive damping, steering and shifting (presumably when equipped with an auto-box).

Last edited by itsSTock69; 01-07-2010 at 04:57 AM. Reason: couldnt get the pictures to work so theyre gone, just click the link
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